Civil War- Leaders & Generals

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 cc128.jpg (68030 bytes)C.S.A. GENERAL FRANK CHEATHAM.  Cabinet card, 6 1/2" x 4 1/4". View of Famed Confederate General . Handy, Washington, D.C. imprint. The L.C. Handy Studio had been located at 494 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC. Levin C. Handy (1855?-1932) was apprenticed at the age of twelve to his uncle, famed Civil War photographer Mathew B. Brady (1823?-1896). Handy became an independent photographer and over the years owned studios in partnership with Samuel Chester and with Chester and Brady.  Scarce image, exhibits strong tonality, contrast and clarity. overall fine condition. (cc.128); $700.  

Benjamin Franklin Cheatham (October 20, 1820 – September 4, 1886), known also as Frank, was a Tennessee aristocrat, California gold miner, and a General in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, serving in many battles of the Western Theater.


cc126.jpg (79675 bytes)C.S.A. GENERAL ALFRED COLQUITT. Cabinet card, 6 1/2" x 4 1/4". A. Bogardus, NY photographer's imprint (however on top can be seen , what appears to be "Sherman & McHughes, Successor to Bogardus" . soiling, some discoloration along top right edge, some surfaces abrasions on back of mount, overallG-VG only. (cc.126; $155.  PRESENTLY ALSO LISTED IN EBAY STORE

Alfred Holt Colquitt (April 20, 1824 – March 26, 1894) was a lawyer, preacher, soldier, 49th Governor of Georgia and two term U.S. Senator from Georgia where he died in office. He served as an officer in the Confederate army, reaching the rank of major general.


cc125.jpg (78484 bytes)C.S.A. GENERAL JOE JOHNSTON. Cabinet card, 6 1/2" x 4 1/4". C.M. Bell Washington, D.C. photographer's imprint . Unfortunately hampered by a vertical surface scar intersecting top center of image. (cc.125; $125.  

Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer, serving with distinction in the Mexican-American War and Seminole Wars, and was also one of the most senior general officers in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. After the war Johnston was an executive in the railroad and insurance businesses. He served a term in Congress and was commissioner of railroads under Grover Cleveland. He died of pneumonia after serving in inclement weather as a pallbearer at the funeral of his former adversary, and later friend, William T. Sherman.

 


 

cw094.jpg (64005 bytes)STEREO- CONFEDERATE GEN. IMBODEN - ANTHONY .Confederate Gen. Imboden - 1860's Anthony. Stereo view, 3 1/4" x 7"; yellow mount, E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. imprint on paste on label. Prominent Portraits, no,. 5469 Major Gen . Imboden, C.S.A.  Some light soiling and foxing, overall VG condition. $345.00

 


 

cc130.jpg (68014 bytes)CABINET CARD - GENERAL WESLEY MERRITT. Cabinet card photograph. 6 1/4” x 4 1/4. View of famed general. St. Paul Photo Co. St. Paul, Minn photographer‘s imprint. Considering his longevity, seldom encountered portrait.. Mount trimmed slightly on bottom slightly affecting the text of imprint, there is a faint square box line surrounding him (waist up); perhaps old cropping marks. O/w image exhibits strong tonality, contrast and clarity. (CC130); $sold.  

Wesley Merritt (1836 –1910) was a general in the United States Army during the American Civil War and the Spanish-American War. He is noted for distinguished service in the cavalry.After the war's end, Merritt continued to serve in the cavalry along the frontier. He was appointed lieutenant colonel of the newly-raised U.S. 9th Cavalry on July 28, 1866, and in July 1867 was sent to command Fort Davis, Texas, garrisoned by six of the regiment's companies. He was made colonel of the 5th Cavalry on July 1, 1876, which he commanded in the Battle of Slim Buttes during the Indian Wars. He served on the frontier until being appointed superintendent of West Point, a post he filled from 1882 to 1887. In 1887, he was appointed a brigadier general in the regular army. He was promoted to major general in the U.S. Army in 1895. As colonel of the 5th Cavalry, Merritt was a member of the court of inquiry which first sat on January 13 1879 presided over by Colonel John H King 9th Infantry, which was convened to consider the behavior of Major Marcus A Reno 7th Cavalry at the Battle of the Little Bighorn ( June 25/26 1876 ) which resulted in the death of General George Armstrong Custer and over 200 men of the 7th Cavalry.


cc136.jpg (72195 bytes)CABINET CARD - GENERAL J.B. RICKETT.  Cabinet card photograph. 6 1/2” x 4 1/4. View of Civil War  general. Handy, Washington DC. photographer‘s imprint. The L.C. Handy Studio had been located at 494 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC. Levin C. Handy (1855?-1932) was apprenticed at the age of twelve to his uncle, famed Civil War photographer Mathew B. Brady (1823?-1896). Handy became an independent photographer and over the years owned studios in partnership with Samuel Chester and with Chester and Brady.  Original image by Brady Studios, published by  Handy. Image exhibits strong tonality, contrast and clarity. (CC136); $250.

GENERAL J.B. RICKETTS Ricketts, James B., brigadier-general, graduated at the United States military academy in 1839, served during the Canadian border disturbances, and took part in the Mexican war, where he was engaged in the battle of Monterey and held the Riconda pass during the battle of Buena Vista. He was promoted captain in 1852, served in Florida against the Seminole Indians, and was then on frontier and garrison duty until the Civil war. His early service in the Civil war was in the defenses of Washington and he commanded a battery in the capture of Alexandria. He distinguished himself in the battle of Bull Run, where he was wounded and taken prisoner. For his gallantry on this occasion he was breveted lieutenant-colonel and commissioned brigadier-general of volunteers, and after being confined as a prisoner of war and being absent on sick leave, he returned to duty in June, 1862, and commanded a division in the Army of Virginia during the Northern Virginia campaign, where he participated in the battles of second Bull Run and Cedar mountain and in the actions at Rappahannock station and Thoroughfare gap He also commanded a division in the Maryland campaign, taking part in the battles of South mountain and Antietam, was promoted major in the regular army, June 1, 1863, and commanded the 3d division, 6th army corps, under Gen. Grant in the Richmond campaign, where he was engaged in the Wilderness, at Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor, and in the siege of Petersburg. He was brevetted colonel for gallantry at Cold Harbor, and in the defense of Maryland against Gen. Early's raid commanded the 3d division under Gen. Wallace at the battle of Monocacy. He commanded the 3d division, 6th army corps, Army of the Shenandoah, at Opequan, Fisher's hill, and Cedar creek, Va., and was severely wounded in the last named battle. Gen. Ricketts was brevetted major-general of volunteers, Aug. 1, 1864. and on March 13, 1865 he was brevetted brigadier-general in the regular army for gallant and meritorious services in the battle of Cedar creek, and major- general U. S. A. for gallant and meritorious services in the field during the war. After the close of hostilities he commanded a district in Virginia until April 30, 1866 when he was mustered out of the volunteer service. He was retired from active service in the regular army, Jan. 3, 1867, with the rank of major-general, for disability incurred from wounds received in battle, and he died in Washington, D. C., Sept. 27, 1887.


cc133.jpg (79191 bytes)CABINET CARD - GENERAL JOHN NEWTON.  Cabinet card photograph. 6 1/2” x 4 1/4. View of Civil War  general. Sarony, NY photographer‘s imprint.  Image exhibits strong tonality, contrast and clarity. (CC133); $250.

John Newton (August 25, 1822 – May 1, 1895) was a career engineer officer in the United States Army, a Union general in the American Civil War, and Chief of the Corps of Engineers. As a division commander  he participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg. After that disastrous defeat, he and other generals journeyed to see President Abraham Lincoln and informed him of their lack of confidence in Army of the Potomac commander Burnside. This was one of the causes of Burnside's relief in January 1863, but it also wounded Newton's career; his appointment to major general on March 30, 1863, was withdrawn the following year when his involvement was understood. In the Battle of Chancellors Ville, Newton was wounded at Salem Church. At Gettysburg, he replaced the slain Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds in command of the I Corps and led it through the defense of Pickett's Charge. He retained command of I Corps until the Army of the Potomac was reorganized in 1864 for Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's Overland Campaign. The I Corps was dissolved, and Newton was sent to the Army of the Cumberland. In the Atlanta Campaign, he commanded the 2nd Division, IV Corps, in Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas's command. He served under Sherman, who regarded him highly. At the Battle of Peachtree Creek, he prevented a dangerous Confederate movement against Sherman and his rapidly constructed works allowed him to turn back the Confederate thrust, a victory that put his official military career back on track.


cc132.jpg (73552 bytes)CABINET CARD - GENERAL WILIAM S. ROSECRANS . Cabinet card photograph. 6 1/2” x 4 1/4. View of Civil War  general. Falk, NY photographer‘s imprint.  Image exhibits very good tonality, contrast and clarity. (CC132); $250.

William Starke Rosecrans (September 6, 1819 – March 11, 1898) was an inventor, coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and United States Army officer. He gained fame for his role as a Union general during the American Civil War. He was the victor at prominent Western Theater battles, but his military career was effectively ended following his disastrous defeat at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863.  

 


cdvcw008.jpg (85224 bytes)GEORGE McCLELLAN . CDV 4 1/4" x 2 3/8". Bust view of McClellan . C.D. Fredricks & Co., New York  photographer's backmark. Two cent green tax stamp. . Exhibits strong tonality, contrast and clarity. (Cdvcw.08); $120. .

 

 

 

 

 

cdvcw011.jpg (97840 bytes)GEORGE McCLELLAN . CDV 4 1/4" x 2 3/8". Standing  view of Little Mac. Anthony/ Brady , New York  photographer's backmark.Some little soiling and wear, a bit of minor foxing, overall VG- Fine. (Cdvcw.11); $120. 

 

 

 

 

 

cdvcw012.jpg (95989 bytes)GEORGE McCLELLAN . CDV 3 3/4" x 2 3/8". Seated  view of McClellan. Anthony/ Brady  New York  photographer's backmark. Two cent green tax stamp on back. Mount trimmed on bottom,,some little soiling and wear,  o/wl VG- Fine. (Cdvcw.12); $110. 

 

 

 


 

cw050.jpg (82702 bytes)U.S. GRANT. Carte de visite. General U.S. Grant. Imprinted w/ "Entered into Congress 1865... J. Chapman, NY".   2 1/3" x 4" . Pirated retouched image, Lincoln mourning ribbon has been removed. . Fine cond. (Cdv948.50). $95.

 

 

 

 

 

cdv940.jpg (93974 bytes)U.S. GRANT. Cdv, Same pose as above. Good tonality and contrast , no photographer's imprint. (Cdv940); $125. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cdv206.jpg (78393 bytes)U.S. GRANT. Carte de visite (4" x 2 1/2")  Lieut. Major General U.S. Grant.  View of Grant wearing Lincoln mourning ribbon on arm. No photographer's id. A bit of wear top center, o/w Fine cond. (Cdv.206): $125.

 


cdv289.jpg (79128 bytes)QUINCY ADAMS GILLMORE. Carte de visite (4" x 2 1/2")  Major General Gillmore.S. Brady's Gallery  backmark.  Some light wear, overall Fine cond. (Cdv.289): $175. 
 Quincy Adams Gillmore (1825 -1888) was an American civil engineer, author, and a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was noted for his actions in the Union victory at Fort Pulaski, where his modern rifled artillery readily pounded the fort's exterior stone walls, an action that essentially rendered stone fortifications obsolete. He earned an international reputation as an organizer of siege operations and helped revolutionize the use of naval gunnery.


cdv288.jpg (66989 bytes)JOHN CHARLES FREMONT.  Carte de visite (4" x 2 1/2"). daring but unstable explorer of the American west, Republican Party candidate in 1856, commanded in the west early in the war, resigned in 1862.  Charles Fredericks NY "Specialite" backmark.  Some light wear, overall Fine cond. (Cdv.288): $200. 


cw018.jpg (54243 bytes)CIVIL WAR - CDV- GENERAL ABSALOM BAIRD. Carte de visite 4 1/8" x 2 3/8". Portrait of Union General Absalom Baird (August 20, 1824 – June 14, 1905)  a career United States Army officer who distinguished himself as a Union Army general in the American Civil War. Baird received the Congressional Medal of Honor for his military actions. Addis, Washington DC backmark. Period pencil id on mount.  Some minor wear to mount, overall Fine cond. (Cw.18)$165.00


cdv404.jpg (73766 bytes)CIVIL WAR - CDV- GENERAL HENRY WALTON WESSELLS. Carte de visite 4 1/8" x 2 3/8".Anthony/ Brady b/m. . Civil War Union Army General Henry Walton Wessells Born:  February 20 1809, Litchfield CT  Died:  January 12 1889, Dover, DE.  Pre-War Profession:  West Point 1833, Seminole War, Mexican war, served on Pacific Coast, Dakotas, Kansas.  War Service:  June 1861 Capt. in 6th US Infantry, September 1861 Colonel of 8th Kansas, served on Missouri border, March 1862 transferred to Army of the Potomac, April 1862 appointed Brig. Gen. of Volunteers, Peninsula campaign, commanded 2nd Bde/2nd Divn/IV Corps at Seven Pines (wounded), Seven Days, commanded District of Albemarle, Plymouth NC, exchanged, served as commissary of prisoners, commanded New York draft rendezvous.  Post War Career:  Army service in the infantry, frontier duty, retired 1871. Some minor wear to mount, overall Fine cond. (Cdv.404)$185.00


 

cw085.jpg (67475 bytes)WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK. Stereoview. Yellow mount, 3 1/4" x 7". E. & H.T. Anthony & Co. Prominent Portraits. No. 2106 Major General Winfield Scott Hancock. Scarce stereo, however exhibits foxing and moderate soiling and wear. Small paper affixed to bottom right of mount with manuscript . (Cw.85); $250.

 

 

 

 

After the resignation of Darius N. Couch, May 22, 1863, Hancock assumed command of the II Corps. July 1, 1863, Hancock and his II Corps were in Maryland when Major General George Gordon Meade, now commanding the Army of the Potomac, sent Hancock to Gettysburg to take command of the field. At 3:30 PM, on July 1, 1863, Hancock arrived at East Cemetery Hill, just outside of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania and went to work establishing the Union battle line that would be known as the "Fish Hook." Over the next two days, Winfield Scott Hancock would play a significant role in the fighting at Gettysburg. On the third day, General Meade placed Hancock in command of the I and III Corps along with his own II Corps. Hancock was now commanding three fifths of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg. During the famed Pickett's Charge Hancock was severely wounded (a wound that would bother him the rest of his life). The Battle of Gettysburg was over and the Union victory would prove to be the result of the leadership of Major General Winfield Scott Hancock. Three years later on April 21, 1866, Hancock would receive the thanks of Congress for his "skill and heroic valor" during the Battle of Gettysburg.


cw084.jpg (65562 bytes)GOVERNEUR WARREN. Stereoview. Yellow mount, 3 1/4" x 7". E. & H.T. Anthony & Co. Prominent Portraits. No. 2185? Major General Governeur K. Warren. Scarce stereo, however exhibits foxing and moderate soiling and wear. Small paper affixed to bottom right of mount with manuscript td. (Cw.84); $250.

 

 

 Promoted to brigadier general on September 26, 1862, he served as chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg. Although he did not command troops at Gettysburg, his advice to Maj. Gen. George Sykes' corps is credited with having helped divert disaster for the Union. Warren was promoted to major general to rank from May 3, 1863, and later led the V Corps in the Overland Campaign of 1864.

 


 

cw053.jpg (17313 bytes)JOHN ANDREW, Signed Cdv. Carte de visite photograph (4" x 2 1/2"). Signed in pen  both on the bottom of mount and also on verso. Miller & Rowell, Boston photographer’s backmark. Dated pencil inscription Apr. 29/ 64. Image, autographs F+ condition, back of mount had been glued at some point, showing remnants of glue over the photographers backmark. Fortunately, the glue is transparent, and the logo can be discerned. (Cw.53); $600.
John Albion Andrew was born May 31, 1818, Windham, Maine, U.S. died Oct. 30, 1867, Boston U.S. antislavery leader who, as governor of Massachusetts during the Civil War, was one of the most energetic of the Northern “war governors.” Andrew entered political life as a Whig opposed to the Mexican War (1846–48). In 1848 he joined the Free-Soil movement against the spread of slavery. After the passage of the Kansas–Nebraska Act (1854), which permitted those territories to choose between slavery and freedom, he helped organize the Republican Party in Massachusetts. In 1859 he defended the abolitionist John Brown so vigorously that he was summoned to Washington to appear before an investigating committee of the Senate. In 1860 he led the Massachusetts delegation at the Republican convention at Chicago, which nominated Lincoln for the presidency; from 1861 to January 1866 he was governor of Massachusetts.  


h579.jpg (33676 bytes)CHARLES SUMNER. Cdv; 4" x 2 3/8" Seated view of Sumner. Published by E. Anthony form Brady's Portrait Gallery. Strong tones and clarity, early cdv, Fine condition. (H579); $95.
Charles Sumner (January 6, 1811 – March 11, 1874) was an American politician and statesman from Massachusetts. A lawyer and a powerful orator, Sumner was the leader of the antislavery forces in Massachusetts and a leader of the Radical Republicans in the United States Senate during the American Civil War and Reconstruction, working to punish the ex-Confederates and guarantee equal rights to the Freedmen. Sumner gained fame as a Republican. One of the most learned statesmen of the era, he specialized in foreign affairs, working closely with Abraham Lincoln to keep the British and the French from intervening on the side of the Confederacy. 

 

 

STATE OF MAINE TESTIMONIAL – CIVIL WAR – JOSHUA CHAMBERLAIN. State of Maine testimonial commends soldier Edwin French for his valor during the Civil War. 15 ˝” x 19 ˝ printed document, dated 4 July 1868, depicts Union Brevet Major General and Governor of Maine Joshua Chamberlain, Adm. Farragut and General Grant, along with wartime illustrations and reads in part: ''You having borne an honorable part as a Volunteer from the State of Maine in the service of the United States in supporting the Rebellion and thereby maintaining the integrity of the Union...by the authority of the Legislature present you this testimonial to your patriotism fidelity courage...'' Imprinted signature, ''Joshua Chamberlain'' and by Adjutant General John C. Caldwell. These testimonials were not signed, but printed (despite some of these documents coming to market claiming to be real signatures).  Exhibits light foxing, toning, two horizontal crease rt and left sides, misc. creasing. Despite condition issues, displays well with good contrast and clarity.

 

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