Civil War- Newspapers

Back to Home
To Civil War Home

To Civil War Leaders & Generals

 

 

nw154.jpg (589244 bytes)CIVIL WAR COPPERHEAD NEWSPAPER -  THE CRISIS. “the Hottest Rebel Sheet to be found in the North or the South”  The Crisis. Columbus Ohio. 20” x 13” 4pp complete, from bound volume.  Described as “the Hottest Rebel Sheet to be found in the North or the South”, this paper, an organ for the copperheads, or peace democrats, opposed the war and attracted the hatred of the Lincoln administration. It was denied circulation in some cities. The editor, Samuel Medary had been an opponent of the Civil War from the beginning in 1861, and insisted slavery could not be prohibited by law. As the war progressed, he became more outspoken in his criticism of the war and those who participated in it. On March 5, 1863, some 150 incensed soldiers from Camp Chase attacked The Crisis' offices, but was not put out of business. In 1864,Medary was indicted by federal grand jury as a spokesman for a subversive group. The Cincinnati Inquirer put up bail and legal defense fund to test wartime freedom of press., but Medary died before the trial.. All issues are in VG– Fine cond., no tears or missing pages. (NW.154); $40. @ or 4/$100.

 


 

CIVIL WAR – CONFEDERATE NEWSPAPER - CHARLESTON TRI- WEEKLY COURIER..  The Tri-Weekly Courier. Charleston, S.C.  4 pp, complete. 26 ½ x 18 ½ .  . Condeferate States of America printed in masthead. Comprising of war related news, along with local and regional affairs ; these being  good examples of a newspaper giving the “atmosphere” of the day.  Confederate newspapers are far scarcer than their Northern counterparts. And though made of rag stock, due to the lack of resources in the South, their grade was inferior to Northern editions. Exhibits vertical and horizontal folds, some staining and foxing, overall G-VG .$75.@ 2/125.SOLD

Sept 12, 1861 sold

Oct. 1, 1861 sold

July 11, 1861
sold

August 22, 1861sold

Feb 26, 1861 sold

Aug 6, 1861sold

March 26, 1861sold

March 21, 1861 sold

April 9, 1861sold

Aug. 29, 1861 sold

Feb 9, 1861 (Does not have the Confederate States yet in masthead. sold

July 6, 1861sold

March 19, 1861  Separated halfway through diagonal center fold line sold

Aug. 27, 1861sold

April 11, 1861sold

Aug 10, 1861sold

Aug 3, 1861sold

Aug 1 , 1861 sold

 

 

 


CIVIL WAR – CONFEDERATE NEWSPAPER - CHARLESTON MERCURY..  The Charleston Mercuryr. Charleston, S.C.  4 pp, complete. 28 x 21 Comprising of war related news, along with local and regional affairs ; these being  good examples of a newspaper giving the “atmosphere” of the day.  Confederate newspapers are far scarcer than their Northern counterparts. And though made of rag stock, due to the lack of resources in the South, their grade was inferior to Northern editions. Exhibits vertical and horizontal folds, some staining.      SOLD


CIVIL WAR – CONFEDERATE NEWSPAPER - CHARLESTON DAILY COURIER..  The Charleston Daily Courier, Charleston, S.C. Sept 3, 1861.  4 pp, complete. 26 ½ x 18 ½ .  . Condeferate States of America printed in masthead. Comprising of war related news, along with local and regional affairs ; these being  good examples of a newspaper giving the “atmosphere” of the day.  Confederate newspapers are far scarcer than their Northern counterparts. And though made of rag stock, due to the lack of resources in the South, their grade was inferior to Northern editions. Exhibits vertical and horizontal folds, some staining and foxing, overall G-VG .$75.SOLD

CIVIL WAR – CONFEDERATE NEWSPAPER - TRI WEEKLY MERCURY. The Charleston Mercurry. Charleston, S.C.  2 pp, complete. 22 x 16 Comprising of war related news, along with local and regional affairs ; these being  good examples of a newspaper giving the “atmosphere” of the day.  Confederate newspapers are far scarcer than their Northern counterparts. And though made of rag stock, due to the lack of resources in the South, their grade was inferior to Northern editions. Exhibits vertical and horizontal folds, some staining and foxing, overall G-VG . $95. 

Sept 12, 1863 SOLD

 

 


nw 03 10 62.JPG (2176225 bytes)MONITOR MERRIMAC  - CONFEDERATE NEWSPAPER - CHARLESTON MERCURY.  The Charleston Mercury. Charleston, S.C. Tuesday, March 10,1862. 4pp. 22 1/2” x 16”. An  important issue with detailed  first reports of the Merrimac’s (Virginia) encounter with the Union Fleet at Hampton Roads., and  the eventual  encounter with the Union Ironclad Monitor.  This detailed report is on the front page, one column, describing the Virginia’s attack on  part of the Union fleet, destroying the USS Congress and USS Cumberland ; with the USS Minnesota running aground. In “the very latest” report, the “famous Yankee ironclad “Ericsson Battery” appeared in the Roads this morning., when a fierce engagement ensued with the Virginia, lasting for some hours….” Another ¼ column ftpg article “Description of the Merrimac”. Overall VG-F, some folds, exhibits typical age toning and light stains, a few small holes on front page, affecting very little text, and not distracting. (nw 031062). $750.

 

 


nw041861.JPG (1086498 bytes)FT SUMPTER-  CONFEDERATE NEWSPAPER - CHARLESTON TRI- WEEKLY COURIER..  The Tri-Weekly Courier. Charleston, S.C.  April 18, 1861 4 pp, complete. 26 ½ x 18 ½ . Condeferate States of America printed in masthead. Much of the frist page is devoted to the incidents of battle of Fort Sumter.. This issue also contains other of war related news, along with local and regional affairs ; Fort sumter accounts from the  a Confederate newspapers in the city whereit happened.. Exhibits vertical and horizontal folds, some staining and foxing, overall VG (Nw041861) . $195.

The First Battle of Fort Sumter opened on April 12, 1861, when Confederate artillery fired on the Union garrison. These were the first shots of the war, and continued all day, watched by many civilians in a celebratory spirit. The fort had been cut off from its supply line, and surrendered next day.  


nw 08 06 61 mercury.jpg (1033209 bytes)MANASSAS - FIRST BULL RUN IN A CONFEDERATE PAPER.  The Charleston Mercury. Charleston, S.C. August 6, 1961 19, 1861. 4pp complete. 27 1/2” x 21”. Front page report with large heading “THE GREAT BATTLE OF MANASSAS. A full Account From the Enemy” . A lengthy ( 4 ½ columns) and detailed report, taken from then correspondence of the New York World. Numerous illustrated advertisements for the volunteer regiments, back page has report of the evacuation of Fort Sumter.  Rag paper,  exhibits light vertical and horizontal folds ,  moderate staining and foxing.

The Union troops were commanded by Gen. Irvin McDowell; the Confederate army by Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Beauregard. The armies clashed on July 21, 1861.  

   The first Union attack seemed to be successful. The Confederate lines fell back, only Gen. Thomas Jackson's brigade maintained their ground (like a stone wall) . The Confederates were reinforced and McDowell's army retreated, and then became a rout with an unorganized flight back to Washington, D.C.  

   First Bull Run had two far-reaching effects. The South rejoiced, but it also developed a false sense of security. The North was dazed; Lincoln and his generals realized that the war would be a long one.  Nw 08 06 61

      

 


 

CIVIL WAR NEWSPAPERS – LOT OF (40 ) MOORES RURAL NEW YORKER. 20 ¼” x 14; 8 pp., published weekly at Rochester, New York. With its graphically appealing masthead, Moore’s main emphasis was agriculture , but also included literature , science, national and regional news. There are fifteen issues from 1865 (two post date Appomattox), and twenty five 1862 issues. Each issue contains one to two pages of war news. Most exhibit some use and handling, with perhaps a small tears, a few minor folds, etc but overall VG- fine condition. There are a few issues from 1865 that exhibit a large circular dampstain. nw 150. $185.  

 

 

 

 

To Civil War Home
To Civil War Leaders & Generals