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h038.jpg (50651 bytes)ANDREW ALLEN, (1740-1825), King George's Attorney General. Manuscript document dated 1772 signed by Andrew Allen, (1740-1825), King George's Attorney General for the province of Pennsylvania, member of the Philadelphia Committee of Safety and of the Continental Congress, opposed Declaration of Independence, appointed Loyalist Lt. Governor of Pennsylvania. Document is an indictment of James Benford for keeping a tavern without a license, signed while Allen was attorney general of Pa. Size 7" by 12" on laid, rag-content paper, watermarked crown over royal crest in a circle. age toned, holes at intersection of folds, edge nicks,, otherwise very good condition. (H.38); $145.   


h041.jpg (48108 bytes)JONATHAN  DICKINSON SERGEANT (1746-93): Patriot, Member of Sons of Liberty, Delegate for New Jersey to the Continental Congress. Autograph manuscript indictment signed by Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant (Serjant) dated 1779.  Document is an indictment of John George Husleman for the theft of 8 pounds from Michael Huff, signed while Sergeant was Attorney General of Pennsylvania. Size 8" by 12 1/2" on laid, rag-content paper. Age toned , holes at intersection of folds (see image), writing and signature clear and strong, overall very good condition(H.41); $165.  


h040.jpg (44579 bytes)WILLIAM BRADFORD (1755-1795) – Washington’s Atty Gen’l. 1790 manuscript document signed by William Bradford (1755-1795). George Washington appointed him to be the Attorney General of the United States in 1794. Colonel in the Continental Army, also held rank as deputy quartermaster general, deputy muster-master general. This document is an indictment of Jacob Smith on a charge of operating a tippling house without license, signed when Bradford was attorney general of Pennsylvania. document is age toned - heavy at folds, small holes at intersection of folds, otherwise VF condition, signature is clear and strong . Size 8" by 12 1/2" on laid, rag-content paper.(H.40); $165.  


h039.jpg (27578 bytes) THOMAS SMITH (1745-1809),  Delegate to the Continental Congress. 1775 manuscript arrest warrant signed by Thomas Smith (1745-1809), Revolutionary War Deputy colonel of Pennsylvania Militia; Delegate from Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress 1781-82; judge of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court 1794-1809. Document is an arrest warrant for John Johnson of Bedford county, signed by Smith while he was clerk of courts. Size 13 1/2" by 4" on laid, rag-content paper. Age toned - heavy at fold, otherwise F condition.(H.39); $125.   

 


 

h843.jpg (14786 bytes)ANNA ELIZABETH DICKINSON CDV. Carte de visite  4'x 2 1/2", ca. 1860's photo, Anthony/ Brady backmark. Some foxing in background, else VG. (H.843); $125.
Dickinson was born in Philadelphia in 1842, was a lecturer on Abolition, women's rights, and other reform topics, remembered for the articulate but emotionally blistering rhetoric that characterized her speaking style. In early 1861 she spoke in Philadelphia on “Women's Rights and Wrongs” to such effect that she received invitations to speak from several platforms throughout New England. Much of Dickinson's work during the Civil War was on behalf of the Republican Party. In January 1864 she addressed a gathering, including President Abraham Lincoln, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Her oratory was marked by fiery passion and remarkable vituperation together with the novelty of her sex and youth, made her enormously popular. After the Civil War she went on the lyceum circuit, delivering addresses across the country on “Reconstruction,” in which she advocated harsh treatment of the South

 


 

h571.jpg (75060 bytes)HENRY WARD BEECHER. Stereo View.  31/2" x 7". Gurney & Son imprint. Henry Ward Beecher (June 24, 1813 – March 8, 1887) was a prominent Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, abolitionist, and speaker in the mid to late 19th century. An 1875 adultery trial in which he was accused of having an affair with a married woman was one of the most notorious American trials of the 19th century. Paste on label on verso for Lowell Mass store. Exhibits some light use and wear, overall Fine cond. (H.571); $145. 


h570.jpg (74496 bytes)HENRY WARD BEECHER. Cabinet card, 6 1/2 x 4 1/4". No photographers imprint. Henry Ward Beecher (June 24, 1813 – March 8, 1887) was a prominent Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, abolitionist, and speaker in the mid to late 19th century. An 1875 adultery trial in which he was accused of having an affair with a married woman was one of the most notorious American trials of the 19th century.  Exhibits some light use and wear, overall Fine cond. (H.570); $95. 

 


 

h761.jpg (181424 bytes)WOMEN SUFFRAGE. Lot of two , Stereo cards. Orange mounts. 3 ½” x 7; 4” x 7”. Same card, but in different size format, with smaller of two having the period pencil id of “ Ladies Voting at 2 Ward at Rockford Ill April 1, 1881”. Sign in crowd reads “ Vote Against License” . This view deserves more research as this could also be related to the WCTU, which in 1881 was active, yet in it’s initial stages of growth. Views by W.T. Seely, Artistic Landscape Photographer, Rockford, Ill. (H.761); $395.

 


 

cc045.jpg (194315 bytes)TEMPERANCE LEADER FRANCIS MURPHY SIGNED CABINET CARD. Cabinet card, 6 1/2" x 4 1/4, of Francis Murphy, pen signed on the back" To our heroic leader Gov. John St. John God Bless you Francis Murphy". Taber, San Francisco, Cal imprint. Slight wear and soiling, t/r corner of mount broken off, o/w VG-Fine cond. (CC.45): $120.

Francis Murphy (1836–1907) was an American temperance evangelist, Beginning in 1870 in New Hampshire, he started temperance reform clubs throughout that state and later, his headquarters were in Pittsburgh, Pa. After his first address there in 1876, 65,000 people signed the pledge he wrote: "With malice toward none, with charity for all, I hereby pledge my sacred honor that, God helping me, I will abstain from the use of all intoxicating liquors as a beverage, and that I will encourage others to abstain."

John St. John server as lieutenant colonel in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was the Republican Governor of Kansas from 1879 to 1883. Active in the temperance movement, he successfully promoted a prohibition amendment to that state's constitution. He was the Prohibition Party candidate for President of the United States in the 1884 election.



h852.jpg (315970 bytes) TEMPERANCE - OHIO WHISKEY WAR BROADSIDE " THE SALOON RAID". 9" x 6 1/2" printed broadside, Feb 27, 1874, The result of a meeting held in Berea (Ohio), describing the narration of  the spokesman ( Mrs. C.E. Bolton), and concluding with the decision " to move on their strongest foes- the saloon keepers at the depot, just outside the corporation limits". Fine condition. (H.852); $350.
One of the major reasons that Ohio went dry ahead of the rest of the country was the influence of the state’s temperance movement, including such groups as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and the Ohio Anti-Saloon League. These groups, who had their origins in social and religious reform movements of the early 1800s, saw alcohol as one of the evils of American society, and aimed to reduce and even eliminate its consumption. In the wake of the Civil War, Ohio temperance advocates, like others across the United States, began to use more radical tactics to stop the consumption of alcohol. For example, in Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1873, women marched through the town, stopping at every saloon (approximately twenty of them) and praying for the souls of the barkeepers and their patrons. The women also demanded that the owners sign a pledge to no longer sell alcohol. By 1875, more than 130 other communities around the state had also had experienced marches–a period often known locally as the “Ohio Whiskey War.”

h953.jpg (836403 bytes)TEMPERANCE - THE SMASHER's MAIL - CARRIE NATION. 10 1/4 x 7 3/4 7" 34 Oct 1901. Vol 1, No. 11. Illustrated front cover with Carrie NAtion holding hatchet. Published Topeka Kansas, Carrie Nation Publisher. " A Newspaper for the Suppression of the Rum Traffic".  In 1901, in Topeka, Kansas, Nation obtained a hatchet which she used thereafter to destroy liquor and saloon property. Carrie toured the nation, rallying anti-alcohol forces and leading fierce attacks on saloons. She was arrested some 30 times between 1900 and 1911 for what she referred to as "hatchetations," but which police called "disturbing the peace." Believing herself divinely ordained to wipe out the presence of strong drink in the United States, she officially changed her name to Carry A. Nation in 1903. The Smasher's Mail was published by Carrie A. Nation in 1901. This scarce publication contains anti-alcohol essays and editorials, reprints of letters Nation received from supporters and opponents, half-tone illustrations, cartoons, and poetry devoted to the temperance and prohibition cause. Somewhat pulpish, age toning of paper, a few minor edge chips , w/ no tears or missing pages., overall fine cond. . (H.953); $165. 

h850.jpg (798593 bytes)TEMPERANCE FLYER MOCK TRAIN SCHEDULE FOR DEAD RIVER RR.  12" x 9" 4pp .Clever temperance flyer, produced by Dr. Walkers Vinegar Bitters, circa 1870, imitating a train schedule for the Dead River Grand Trunk Railway--Rum Policy, President, S.U.R.E DEATH, Superintendent. The train leaves Sobriety, with stops at Tipsyville, Guzzler's Glory, Cursington, Pauperville, Delirium Falls, etc--last stop Sulphurdom (Hell Gate). The conductor of the Jersey Lightning Express is Satan devil, Esq... "At Poison Switch, a short branch road leads to Perdition Camp..." "It carries more than 1,500,000,000 to Destruction..." It's not dated, but t is a reference to the National Beer Congress, 9th annual session in June 1869, so probably printed shortly thereafter. The back page is an ad for Vinegar Bitters. Scarce. Fine condition. (H.850); $395. 

sm978.jpg (493981 bytes)SHEET MUSIC – THE TEE-TO-TAL SOCIETY, 1840. LITHOGRAPH COVER . Sheet music. 13 ¼ x 10 ½. 4pp. Teetotalism is the practice or promotion of complete personal abstinence from alcoholic beverages. A person who practices (and possibly advocates) teetotalism is called a teetotaler (also spelled teetotaller; plural teetotalers or teetotallers) or is simply said to be teetotal. The teetotalism movement was first started in Preston, England in the early 19th century. . From bound volume, with accompanying bindery markings along spine. Exhibitsd some minor wear on the edges, as well as minor soiling, overall VG+ condition  (Sm.978); $155.  

 

SHEET MUSIC – THE TEE-TO-TAL SOCIETY, 1840. LITHOGRAPH COVER . Sheet music. 13 ¼ x 10 ½. 4pp. Teetotalism is the practice or promotion of complete personal abstinence from alcoholic beverages. A person who practices (and possibly advocates) teetotalism is called a teetotaler (also spelled teetotaller; plural teetotalers or teetotallers) or is simply said to be teetotal. The teetotalism movement was first started in Preston, England in the early 19th century. . From bound volume, with accompanying bindery markings along spine. Exhibitsd some minor wear on the edges, as well as minor soiling, overall VG+ condition  See photograph. Sm978

 


 

 MUSIC FOR PATRIOTS,POLITICANS AND PRESIDENTS.HARMONIES AND DISCORDS OF THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS. Lawrence,Vera Brodsky. First Printing 1975 MacMillan. 480 pages; 9.5" x 12",  Very good+(plus) with some light wear to the bottom edge of the boards and corners/ VG DJ. "The songs of America's fist hundred years were as influential in their time as radio and television today. Our forefathers were incited to early resistance by songs protesting the Stamp Act, soldiers were inspired to deeds of valor by rousing military marches; and Americans of all political persuasions were quickly informed of the latest triumphs and disasters through ballad broadsides, songsters, and sheet music dealing with contemporary events in colorful detail. Campaign songs were vital in communicating messages to masses of people. At a time when electioneering by political candidates was considered unseemly, bitter election campaigns were waged through songs, and politicians hired songwriters as readily as they hire public relations and advertising writers today. It is a remarkable collection with lyrics from pre-Revolutionary resistance to post-Civil War Reconstruction, covering nearly every important issue and event in the history of that period: the Constitution, presidential campaigns, battles, defeats, heroes, villains, slavery, abolition, and even women's rights. Accompanying each song- many of which are facsimiles of the original music pages is Ms. Lawrence's informative and witty commentary. Contemporary documentary material gives enlightening historical background and explains the incidents and personalities that inspired the song text. The vitality of these songs is reflected in the splendid illustrations that appear on every page. Besides reproductions of rare sheet music and illustrated broadsides of the 18th and 19th centuries, full page replicas in black and white and in color of pictorial sheet music covers- a beguiling virtually unexplored branch of American art are included in the book's more than 500 illustrations, which together offer a rare opportunity to see as well as to hear history happen again.  

 


 

h070.jpg (71489 bytes)1719 COLONIAL SUMMONS  - COMMITTING FORNICATION. Colonial American Document, Hand laid paper and has a papermakers watermark.  Sheriff in His Majesty's Name Summoning The wife of Obadiah Blandon of Attleboro in The Massachusetts Bay Colony that she appear before the Justices of our King at the Court of Peace on the fifth Day of May Then and There to answer to a Presentment of the Grand Jury for COMMITTING FORNICATION, SHE HAVING A CHILD BORN OF HER BODY WITHIN FOUR MONTH'S OF MARRIAGE and not depart without a License Fail Not!  Sound condition, has two stains along left edge on folds (two small pcs of archival document repair tape on back. (H.70); $250.  


h071.jpg (91637 bytes) 1726 COLONIAL AMERICAN BOND. 12 1/4" x 7 1/4  Hand Laid Paper with a Full Papermakers Watermark and has one of the Best Personal Seals that I have seen. This Document is a Bond for Isaac Little Esq of Pembrook in the County of Plymouth in the Province of the Massachusetts Bay Colony to Job Almy Merchant in Newport in The Colony of Rhode Island for One Hundred and Eighty Pounds Current Lawful Money of NEW ENGLAND to be paid in current money, or or in Good Lawful Bills of Credit on this Province ensuing the date hereof ,without Fraud,Coven or Further Delay. (H.71); $165. 


h073.jpg (91237 bytes) 1726 COLONIAL AMERICAN BOND Full Papermakers Watermark in it's Hand Laid Paper.  This Bond is for Forty Pounds Good and Lawful Money of New England and shows a Thumbprint Seal of the Bounden George Hall Husbandman of Easton in "The Massachusetts Bay Colony". That he be Holden and stand firmly bound and Obliged unto Thomas Hayward Yoeman of Bridgewater in the County of Plymouth to be paid in good bills of credit or current Lawful Silver Money of New England with Lawful interest for the same on or before The Twentieth Day of January Twenty six: seven without Fraud, Coven, or Further delay.(H.73)$165. 


h072.jpg (108680 bytes)1741 COLONIAL AMERICAN DOCUMENT. 12” x 7 ½” Colonial American document,has a  4" Kings Crown Watermark in it's Hand Laid Paper and a Massachusetts Bay Colony Seal. This Document has Ebenezer Rumerill Shopkeeper of Newport, R.I. Sueing Zepe Baker Cooper for Thirty three pounds Sixteen Shillings and Eight Pence Money, Debt and Damage. We Command You to take the said Body of Zepe Baker and COMMIT him into our GOAL and detain in your custody within our said Goal, until he pay the full sums above-said, with your Fees, or that he be Discharged by the said Ebenezer Rumerill. (H.72)$165.  

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