Political

Back to Home
To Political Movemnts Causes

 

 

h532.jpg (87894 bytes)POLITICAL -1800 GEORGE WASHINGTON POEM 23 pp BOOKLET. Hartford: 1800 23pp, 8 3/8" x5 1/8" ; string tied wraps. Light toning, light foxing , light edge chipping t/ l corner. Very Good. Dictionary of American Biography calls Alsop "the most gifted of the 'Hartford Wits.'" He dedicates this poem to Martha Washington. First edition. $165.00

 


 

h094.jpg (612782 bytes)1805 THOMAS JEFFERSON INAUGURAL SPEECH. The Balance and Columbian Repository. Hudson (New York), March 19,1805. 11 1/8” x 9 1/8”. Thomas Jefferson second Inaugural Speech, signed in type by Jefferson. Rag stock, overall VG condition, moderate  foxing, spine split, from bound volume.(Nw22); $115.sold
At this time, Harry Croswell was the publisher of this newspaper. In 1801 Croswell moved to Hudson, New York, to join the retired minister Ezra Sampson, and a bookseller, George Chittenden, in publication of the independent newspaper called The Balance and Columbian Repository. The thrust of the paper was Croswell's acerbic (many would say venomous) political commentary. Croswell was indicted for libel in an earlier paper he edited called The Wasp, and was defended by Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton's made an eloquent argument for liberty of the press , and that men as well as policies are be subject to public scrutiny. The eventual outcome of this celebrated case would establish limits to the freedom of the press.


h524.jpg (326951 bytes)1848 LETTER REGARDING ZACHARY TAYLOR. Two page ALS, from C.W. Lytle, New Orleans, July 5, 1848 to Miss Mary Talbott, Baltimore, MD. 9 ¼” x 11” blue , stampless cover, Paid 10, Circular New Orleans Jul 6, La, postmark. Two page pen manuscript letter, the first paragraph concerns itself with genealogy of the Lytle family, and specifically Robert T. Lytle (Robert Todd Lytle ( was a politician who represented Ohio in the US House from 1833-1835). He further writes regarding Zachary Taylor In part:
“…I suppose that Baltimore like all the large cities the nomination was for Clay, such was not the case here and a great of dissatisfaction was expressed at first but I believe the Whigs have all come to the conclusion that Rough & Ready is the most available man in the party(.) the old man is here now and whenever he is surrounded by a crowd all wanting to shake hands with him to look at or to hear him speak(.) you would be amused to see the old man going about with a crowd of little boys who whenever the General stops to speak to any one close up on him sometimes so close that he is obliged to speak to them which is always the kindest manner(.) when they disperse some satisfied while other follow on to get another word or shake of his hand(.) the old General seems to love everybody to love him the Socofocus are very uneasy for they do not dare say any thing against him and he must be a good man who Socos do not abuse…yours most affectionately, C.W. Lytle.
(A few months later, on November 7, 1848, the first time the entire nation voted on the same day, Taylor and Fillmore narrowly defeated the Democratic ticket, headed by Michigan's Lewis Cass, and the ticket of the Free-Soil Party, led by former President Martin Van Buren)
Overall fine condition.  (H.524) $245.


PRESTON KING ALS – Republican Party. A two page letter ink hand written by early Republican leader Preston King. (H.698); $95.
 "Odgensburg (NY) Sepy 13/55 (1855) J.B. Ayres Esq Chmn Rep. Conv. Dear Sir Your letter of the 5th inst inviting me to address a Meeting at the Court House in Yates Co. sometime in October next is recd. I am not a ready or fluent speaker and must therefore be excused from as tempting that share of our work which others can do much better and more easily than myself. I expect to go to the Republican convention at Syracuse on the 26th inst and shall labor diligently by all honorable means to promote the Republican cause (see early history of the Republican Party below) and therefore with the less delicacy or hesitation excuse myself from that service which can be much better done by others - with strong hopes of success in the Republican movement and permanent resolution of the principles of constitutional freedom in the administration of the Government. Very Respectfully & truly Yours Preston King".
Preston King was born in Ogdensburg, New York on October 14th, 1806. A member of the Democratic Party he was elected to the 28th Congress and served from March, 1843 to March, 1847. He moved to the Free Soil Party and again served in the 31st and 32nd Congress (March, 1849 to March, 1853). King joined the new Republican Party and was elected to Congress in 1856 but decided not to seek re-election when his term ended in March, 1863. When Andrew Johnson became president on 15th April, 1865, he invited King to Washington and served as his adviser. Appointed collector of the port of New York, Preston King committed suicide soon afterwards by jumping from a ferryboat in the harbor in November, 1865.


h549.jpg (82877 bytes)1856 JOHN C. FREMONT ILLUSTRATED LETTERSHEET.  Prophetstown, (Illinois.) 7 3/4" x 7"  ALS ( not political in nature). Illustrated with the 1856 Republican Party nominee for president of John C. Fremont. This was glued in a ledger book, though cleanly removed,  some of the red lines have transferred to back of paper. Judging by the size, probably trimmed to size. Overall VG. (H.549); $245.


h504.jpg (27233 bytes)HORACE GREELEY. Cdv portrait. 4" x 2 1/2" Ca. 1860s seated portrait of the editor of the NY Times, and later the 1872 presidential candidate of the new Liberal Republican Party, crusading against the corruption of Grant's  Republican administration. E.&H. T. Anthony backmark. VG condition. (H.504); $120. 


h519.jpg (104288 bytes)HORACE GREELEY. CA. 1872 ANTI GREELEY PAMPHLET. HORACE GREELEY, "THE CHAPPAQUA SAGE. " WHAT HE KNOWS ABOUT PARTISAN POLITICS- GLANCES AT HIS POLITICAL RECORD. [np.: 1872] 8pp, caption title [as issued]. Good+. A scarce anti-Greeley presidential campaign pamphlet. Running as a Liberal Republican in 1872 against Grant Administration corruption and incompetence, Greeley had the misfortune to have a long and detailed public record which demonstrated a inconsistency on a variety of issues.  Not in Sabin, Miles, Eberstadt, Decker. (H.519); $125. 


h526.jpg (71980 bytes)TWEED RING MAYOR SIGNED CHECK. A. Oakley Hall. Check drawn on the account of the City of New York, signed by mayor A. Oakley Hall (and others). 1871, 3 ¾“ x 8 1/8". Blue on white paper. I have small number of these check, payee may be different than illustrated. All are in Fine condition. (H.526);$45.
A. Oakley Hall 1826-1896 was Mayor of New York from 1869 to 1872, and was alleged to have been part of the "Tweed Ring". In particular, Thomas Nast, the famed political cartoonist, took aim at "Elegant Oakey" whom he considered to be the worst of the Tweed politicians because of his high standing, education and open presidential ambitions. Nevertheless, Hall was entirely acquitted of all charges and, immediately following his mayoral tenure, he served as editor for the New York World, then a major daily newspaper. He then became a London correspondent to the paper and eventually resumed the practice of law in England. Later historians have questioned the depiction of Hall as corrupt or as a front man for a corrupt political order, even if the popular image has stuck.


h599.jpg (218427 bytes)JOHN HOFFMAN, MAYOR OF NEW YORK. SIGNED CHECK. . 1868, 3 ¾“ x 8 1/8". Blue on white paper.  New York City, July 31,1868. Drawn on the Broadway National Bank for the payment of Judicial Salaries. Signed by  John Thompson Hoffman (1828 - 1888). (H.599); $45.

Hoffman was the Recorder of New York City (1861-1865) and Mayor of New York City (1866-1868). He served as the 23rd Governor of New York (1869-1872). Connections to the Tweed Ring ruined his political career, in spite of the absence of evidence of his personal involvement in corrupt activities.
A. Oakley Hall 1826-1896 was Mayor of New York from 1869 to 1872, and was alleged to have been part of the "Tweed Ring". In particular, Thomas Nast, the famed political cartoonist, took aim at "Elegant Oakey" whom he considered to be the worst of the Tweed politicians because of his high standing, education and open presidential ambitions. Nevertheless, Hall was entirely acquitted of all charges and, immediately following his mayoral tenure, he served as editor for the New York World, then a major daily newspaper. He then became a London correspondent to the paper and eventually resumed the practice of law in England. Later historians have questioned the depiction of Hall as corrupt or as a front man for a corrupt political order, even if the popular image has stuck.


h601.jpg (158536 bytes)FERNANDO WOOD- MAYOR SIGNED CHECK. New York City checks signed by Mayor Fernando Wood, Clerk D. T. Valentine and the comptroller,  dated 1855.3 1/2" x 7" Drawn on the Mechanics' Bank, they are printed in red on blue paper and have the usual bank cancellation marks, not affecting Fernando Wood's signature. 
Wood (1812-1881) was a merchant, a US Congressman before, during and after the Civil War and the Grand Sachem of Tammany Hall. He was mayor from 1855-1857 and again from 1860-1862. Valentine was a long time city official who wrote annual directories on the city of New York and also wrote a history of the city. Checks are written for street paving expenses, and is endorsed on the back. I have small number of these checks, payee may be different than illustrated. All are in Fine condition. (H.601);$45.

 

s


h528.jpg (133896 bytes)U.S. GRANT. 1875 LETTER, MEETS PRESIDENT GRANT AND PARTY. ALS, pen manuscript, 5 page letter, with cover. Harry Thornton in Denver to his mother Mrs. Lucy Thornton in San Francisco. The letter is dated 10/10/1875 and the envelope has a corner card for the Inter-Ocean Hotel in Denver. The letter begins with some social activities, Mr. Thornton's meeting with 2 young ladies, a trip to an ice cream "saloon" . He follows with 2 pages describing a meeting with Pres. Grant and his party at the hotel: Pres Grant “his face is fat & heavy. There was no indication in or about him of genius or power“ and Mrs. Grant “is a big woman, crosseyed, and not handsome--but agreeable“. Continues with other members of the Grants party (Col. Fred Grant, Mrs. Borie, etc).A candid and truly delightful letter. (H.528);$200.

 


 

h520.jpg (220804 bytes)1876 LETTER REGARDING HAYES- TILDEN ELECTION. 4pp ALS, Centralia, Boone Co., Mo. Nov.14,1876. Good content regarding the contested 1876 election. In part:
...but the election was just at hand and felt deeply interested in the result and perfectly satisfied that Tilden is elected but fear he is to be counted out by fraudulent and designing one they have it in there power  and I am of the opinion they intend to exercise that power the final result we can not forsee yet (.) I fear the result how people will submit if Tilden is counted out is a question yet to be determined particularly in your Southern States(.) here we are for Tilden largely in the majority every thing is Democratic here by large majorities in our county it is no use for a radical to offer the only trouble here is that Democrats run by against each other this makes it pretty warm with our county officials out side of that they stick to the party ...
Goes on for the another half a part , relates rumors of letting them count the vote and the occupational soldiers to go back home.
Handwriting a hint light, very legible, small dime size pc missing along edge not affecting text, overall Vg cond. (H.520); $185.
Samuel Tilden, the Democratic Party candidate for president in 1876, won approximately 250,000 more popular votes than his Republican Party opponent Rutherford B. Hayes, however the electoral vote in several states was contested. The electoral commission  created by Congress declared Hayes the winner by one electoral vote, and Tilden retired from public life. 


h529.jpg (130168 bytes)BLAINE LOGAN. JUGATE ILLUSTRATED LETTERSHEET. 1884 , 10 1/2" x 8" Arrowsmith, Ill. ALS two sided pen manuscript (unsure of content, unfortunately not written in English). Nice illustration of Blaine and Logan.  Discoloration along fold lines, small area with loss of paper at one intersection of fold, o/w G. (H.529); $90. 


sm634.jpg (641810 bytes)1884 CLEVELAND AND HENDRICKS GRAND VICTORY MARCH. 14" x 11". Complete, nice jugate of the Democratic ticket. Small piece of paper affixed to t/l coner, o/w VG. (sm634). $SOLD.


h533.jpg (429836 bytes)ANTI BEN BUTLER / GREEN BACK SATIRICAL BANKNOTE. 3 ½ x 7 ¾ 1884.  A great anti-Benjamin Butler printed "Absolute Money" satirical banknote. Green printed one thousand dollar bill being an anti-Greenback Party, a political party who proposed printing more paper currency in order to combat the desire to trade in specie known as "ABSOLUTE MONEY for the sum of ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS." The bill is flanked on either side by vignettes of Butler and the printing press printing stacks of money.  The verso is equally amusing with much more derogatory financial content and cartoon with Butler feeding geese or ducks with paper labeled “This is Corn”. Some minor border wear, o/w Vg- Fine cond/ (h533); $155.

 

h533back.jpg (396170 bytes)

 

 

 

 

Top of Page
Back to Home