America's Conflicts & Militaria

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  h085.jpg (201845 bytes)BOSTON TEA PARTY. The London Magazine or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer. January 1774 .8 ¼” x 5 ¼”. 52pp. great report of the Boston Tea Party, mentioning in part: body of the people of this & all adjacent towns…assembled at the Old South Meeting House to enquire the reason of the delay in sending the ship Dartmouth, with the East India Tea, back to London…The people finding all their efforts to preserve the property of the East India Company and reurn it safely to London, frustrated by the Tea Consignees, the collector of the customers & the Governor of the Province, dissolved their meeting-But, behold what followed! A number of resolute men dressed like Mohawks or Indians determined to do all in their power to save their country from the ruin which their enemies had plotted, in less than four hours emptied every chest of Tea on board the three ships amounting to 342 chests, into the sea! Without the least damage done to the ships with much more. Nice lengthy(1 ¼ column report , along with another small report about the value of the tea. From disbound yearly volume, small cut from t/r corner title page, overall VG. (H.85). $550.


nw 06 14 70.JPG (1098761 bytes)AMERICAN REVOLUTION JOHN HANCOCK, THE RICHARDSON TRIAL & THE BOSTON MASSACRE 1770
Complete original 4pp. issue of the WHITEHALL EVENING POST, London, June 14, 1770. The Governor refuses to recognize JOHN HANCOCK as interim speaker of the house: News from Boston: "LAST WEEK MR. CUSHING WAS SEIZED WITH A FIT OF THE GOUT, AND UNABLE TO ATTEND THE HOUSE. MR. HANCOCK WAS CHOSEN AS TEMPORARY SPEAKER BY MAJORITY OF 70 OUT OF 74, AND WAS PRESENTED TO THE GOVERNOR FOR HIS APPROBATION. HIS HONOUR'S ANSWER WAS: 'BY VIRTUE OF THE AUTHORITY GIVEN TO ME BY THE ROYAL EXPLANATORY CHARTER, I DISAPPROVE OF THE CHOICE YOU HAVE MADE'....AFTER THE SPEECH WAS READ THE WHOLE HOUSE WAS SILENT FOR UPWARDS OF 10 MINUTES.... THEY PROCEEDED TO A NEW ELECTION, AND WARREN OF PLYMOUTH WAS CHOSEN, AND THE GOVERNOR APPROVED THEIR CHOICE.....THE GOVERNOR SALARY WAS WARMLY DEBATED. BRIG. RUGGLES EXERTED HIMSELF WITH GREAT SPIRIT IN SUPPORT OF THE GOVERNOR'S CLAIMS. HE ATTACKED HANCOCK IN VERY SEVERE MANNER... " Front page news of the TRIAL OF EBENEZER RICHARDSON in a letter from Boston dated April 20: "I MENTIONED THE COMMITTEE... INSISTED ON...PROCEEDING, WITHOUT ADJOURNMENT, ON THE TRIAL OF PRESTON, ETC....THE COURT FOUND IT NECESSARY IN ORDER TO KEEP THEM A LITTLE QUIET TO ARRAIGN RICHARDSON FOR THE KILLING YOUNG SEIDER.... RICHARDSON WAS ARRAIGNED ON MONDAY... ACCORDINGLY ON FRIDAY HE WAS BROUGHT TO THE BAR AND ASKED BY THE COURT IF HE WAS THEN READY. HE OBSERVED TO THE COURT THAT HE HAD APPLICATIONS TO ALMOST EVERY LAWYER IN TOWN TO UNDERTAKE HIS CASE, WHICH NO ONE WOULD DO; THAT THE CONSTABLES HAD REFUSED SUMMONING WITNESSES; THAT THE JAILER HAD USED HIM IN SO CRUEL MANNER THAT HE WAS EVEN FREQUENTLY DEBARRED THE LIBERTY OF CONVERSING WITH HIS FRIENDS; AND THAT EVERY NEWSPAPER WAS CROWDED WITH THE MOST INFAMOUS AND FALSE LIBELS AGAINST HIM, IN ORDER TO PREJUDICE THE MINDS OF HIS JURY. THAT WITHOUT COUNSEL, WITHOUT THE PRIVILEGE OF CALLING UPON HIS WITNESSES TO SUPPORT HIS INNOCENCE, HE WAS NOW TO BE TRIED FOR HIS LIFE. THE JUDGES, MOVED WITH COMPASSION AND HIS REPRESENTATION, PUT OFF THE TRIAL FOR THE DAY. THE COURT THEN MADE AN APPLICATION TO SEVERAL LAWYERS PRESENT TO APPEAR AS HIS COUNSEL, BUT...ALL OF THEM DECLINED. THE COURT... EXERTED THEIR AUTHORITY AND ORDERED MR. FITCH, THE ADVOCATE GENERAL, TO APPEAR ON HIS BEHALF AT HIS TRIAL. FITCH MADE USE OF A VARIETY OF ARGUMENTS IN ORDER TO EXCUSE HIMSELF, WHICH THE COURT DID NOT JUDGE SUFFICIENT. HE CONCLUDED BY SAYING THAT SINCE THE COURT HAD PREEMPTORILY ORDERED HIM, HE WOULD UNDERTAKE IT. THE COURT ALSO ORDERED THE HIGH SHERIFF TO GIVE PARTICULAR INSTRUCTIONS TO HIS OFFICERS, WITH RESPECT TO THE SUMMONING OF WITNESSES....AFTER THEIR ADJOURNMENT RICHARDSON IS TWICE BEEN BROUGHT TO THE BAR, BUT HIS WELL DISPOSED COUNSEL , MR. FITCH, HAS BEEN SICK BOTH TIMES, IN CONSEQUENCE OF WHICH THE COURT APPOINTED JOSIAH QUINCY, AND RICHARDSON IS AT THIS DAY (APRIL 20) UPON TRIAL...." Account of the Richardson trial continues: "RICHARDSON'S TRIAL CONTINUED TO 12 O'CLOCK LAST NIGHT AND THE JURY STAYED UNTIL 8 O'CLOCK THIS MORNING....THE JUDGES GAVE THEIR CHARGE TO THE JURY WITH GREAT SPIRIT AND GOOD SENSE. JUDGE OLIVER SAID THAT THE PRISONER HAD BEEN GUILTY OF NOTHING BUT MANSLAUGHTER....ALL THE JUDGES WERE AGREED THAT THE PRISONER HAD DONE NOTHING MORE THAN NECESSITY HAD CONSTRAINED HIM TO DO...VAST CROWDS OF PEOPLE ATTENDED DURING THE WHOLE TRIAL. AFTER THE JUDGES HAD DELIVERED THEIR OPINION THE MOB GREW VERY OUTRAGEOUS. THEY REPEATEDLY CALLED OUT FOR HANGING...THEY SOMETIMES CALLED OUT 'REMEMBER JURY, YOU ARE UPON OATH OF BLOOD SPLATTERED'... AT 8 O'CLOCK THIS MORNING THE JURY BROUGHT IN THEIR VERDICT OF GUILTY OF MURDER. THE JUDGES IMMEDIATELY ADJOURNED THE COURT TO MAY WITHOUT PASSING SENTENCE...."

 (On February 22 young Christopher Seider was killed by Ebenezer Richardson., a customs official who randomly fired into a mob that had gathered outside his house. A large funeral was arranged by Sons of Liberty leader Samuel Adams. His death, along with a burst of anti-British propaganda, badly inflamed the situation in the city and led many to seek confrontations with British soldiers leading to the infamous "BOSTON MASSACRE" on March 5, 1770. Richardson was tried and convicted of murder, but the royally appointed judges delayed sentencing him because they felt he should and would receive a pardon from London).

Complete original example of a scarce newspaper with fine masthead featuring the Banqueting Hall at Whitehall. Fine impression of a TAX STAMP at the lower RH corner of the front page. (Nw061470); $250.

  


h006.jpg (282516 bytes)1775 LAND DEED LEXINGTON ALARM . Land deed, 12 3/4 x 7 1/2. March 8, 1775 (one month before Lexington and Concord). Three men mentioned in this deed, Benjamin Convers, Calvin Skinners and Jonathan Porter, all from the town of Killingly, served in the Lexington Alarm of 1775. Some separation along fold lines (repaired on back with transparent archival tape). Overall VG+. Also included is a copy of the names of the men from the Town of Killingly and number of days served. (H.06); $265.    


  h087.jpg (274562 bytes) CAPTURE OF NEW YORK. The Universal Magazine (London, England) dated Nov, 1776. Four 4 pages of detailed news of the capture of New York City by the British during the American Revolution. Three long letters signed in type by British General William Howe details the Battle of Harlem Heights, the retreat of General George Washington and his army from NY and the British taking of New York City. Very important Revolutionary War news report. The Universal magazine was not bound with a title page, and the map of New York is not present in this magazine. (H.87)$250.

To protect New York City and the lower Hudson valley from the British forces massed on Staten Island, on Aug. 27, 1776 George Washington sent part of his small army to defend Brooklyn Heights, on Long Island. After several unsuccessful peace overtures, Sir William Howe landed at Gravesend while the British fleet under his brother, Richard Howe, shelled New York. After Sir William's troops defeated an American force under John Sullivan and William Alexander (Lord Stirling), Israel Putnam, the corps commander, prepared for the main attack. Sir William, not wanting another Bunker Hill, decided to lay siege instead of storming Brooklyn Heights. Washington saw the position was hopeless and evacuated (night of Aug. 29-30) his army back to Manhattan. Shortly afterward, the Americans began the retreat northward in which delaying actions were fought at Harlem Heights, White Plains, and Fort Washington. Washington managed to extricate most of his troops, and he regrouped them before striking at Trenton
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Also included are three pages of detailed reports regarding the actions of the naval fleet on Lake Champlain (a letter signed in type by Guy Carleton , a letter from Capt Douglas and a letter by Captain Pringle “ upon the 11th I came up with the Rebel Fleet commanded by Benedict Arnold. regarding the actions of the naval fleet on Lake Champlain. 
In the spring of 1776 the British had a force of 10,000 men in place with plans to divide the American Colonies in half by taking control of Lake Champlain and driving down the Hudson River Valley thus splitting the colonies. Though the summer of 1776 American forces frantically raced to build a Naval fleet for the lake. On October 11, 1776 a squadron on fifteen hastily built American warships commanded by Benedict Arnold engaged a superior British fleet. The resulting cannon battle lasted for 5 hours with the American force loosing 2 boats, ten percent of their man power and being blockaded by the British. This battle was known as "The Battle of Valcour Island".. Desperate, Arnold and his officers planned a daring night time retreat past the British blockade. Under the cover of darkness with oars silenced by greased rags, Arnold's fleet of gun boats slipped past the British fleet. Arnold continued to fight on for three more days before retreating to Fort Ticonderoga.


  h086.jpg (134756 bytes)BENEDICT ARNOLD'S TREASON. REVOLUTIONARY WAR. THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, AND HISTORICAL CHRONICLE. Lot of (2). November, 1780, 46pp and 1 plate and Supplement for the year 1780, 34 pp. and 1 plate London: Sylvan Urban, 1780. Octavo (8 3/8” X 5 3/8”) . From bound volume, remnants of leather along spine, F condition. Of great historical note is the November issue, which publishes the letter from Sir Henry Clinton, dated New York, Oct 12th, informing his Lord Geo. Germaine, that "Maj- Gen. Arnold has quitted the rebel service and joined the king's standard...but which terminated most fatally for Major Andre who had been taken prisoner...condemned to suffer death... which sentence was ordered by the rebel general Washington to be carried into execution…” In the supplement for the year, is a lengthy,7 page report of the "Proceedings on the Trial of Major Andre" ¨ with great detail. One section begins "Major Andre, Adjutant General to the British Army will be brought before your examination. He came within our lines in the night, on an interview with Major Gen. Arnold, and in an affirmed character, and was taken within our lines, in a disguised habit with a pass under a feigned name and with the enclosed papers concealed upon him.... (signed) G. Washington." Report continues for 6 more pages. Two key issues. (H.86). $325.


h004.jpg (37800 bytes)1782 CONNECTICUT COURANT NEWSPAPER, GEN'L WASHINGINTON.  Tuesday, March 5, 1782 The Connecticut  Courant newspaper. One quarter column page 2 letter by General Washington concerning the deserting of soldiers of the Continental Army. Washington in a proclamation offers a pardon to those who have deserted if they return and return to their uniforms. Other war news, advertisements . Rag stock, some minor foxing, VG. (H.04); $135.  


mh040.jpg (533662 bytes)REVOLUTIONARY WAR. Nicholas Quackenbush signed receipt . February 1783,  by the Assistant Quarter Master for the Continental Army in Albany, NY, Major Nicholas Quackenbush, which reads: "Sir, Please to pay to William Greene One Pound in such goods as he may want”.  It is made out to "Mr. Henry Hart. Merchant.
Nicholas Quackenbush (1734-1813) was a member of a powerful Dutch family in the Hudson River Valley. He sided with the Revolutionary cause, serving as Assistant Deputy Quartermaster to the Continental forces in Albany with rank as Major. In this capacity, Quackenbush, situated roughly half way between Albany and Montreal, was one of the most important people in the region, coordinating critical supplies that would ultimately result in the defeat of Burgoyne at Saratoga in 1777 and help secure the Mohawk valley frontier against Loyalist and Indian raids.
 (Mh.40); $215.


mh042.jpg (741530 bytes)SON OF LIBERTY -REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEADER MARINUS WILLETT.  Signed court order, August 20th, 1784. 4 3/8 x 7 1/2. two sided part imprinted court document, signed on verso by Marinus Willett as Sheriff of New York. Partail document, appears to be mising a small section left side, split at fold line, old repair, minor edge loss of paper,  o/w VG, signature Fine .(Mh. 42); $225. 
Marinus Willett (July 31, 1740 – August 22, 1830) was an American soldier and political leader from New York. He was characterized by historian Mark M. Boatner as "one of the truly outstanding American leaders of the Revolution."  Willett was born in Jamaica, New York, on Long Island. He served in the militia during the French and Indian War.   A political radical, he became a leader of the New York Sons of Liberty, and fought valiantly during the Revolution. After the war he aligned himself with George Clinton and the anti-federalist party. He and several other members of the Sons of Liberty were elected to the State Assembly in December 1783. He was Sheriff of New York County, New York from 1784 to 1787 and from 1791 to 1795.He took part in the putting down of Shays' Rebellion.  He died on August 22, 1830 and was buried in the churchyard of Trinity Church, corner of Broadway and Wall Street, in New York City. His funeral had 10,000 mourners. 

 


 

h083.jpg (87044 bytes)WAR OF 1812 LETTER. One page ALS, stampless cover, New York, Sept 1813. 10" x 8 1/4". Relates recruiting and the capturing of the prize Boxer by the privateer Enterprise.    In part:
Dear Parents, ...Yesterday I went with the Col and some of the other officers to visit the forts in a sail boat. ...I expect you know more abbout the war in the sound than we do here. the gun boats have gone up & a private armed vessel was fitted out here yesterday.The Privateer Enterprise has taken the Boxer and carried her into Portland(.) There were sixty killed on board the Boxer...Your dutiful son, John Ingerson .(H.83)$120.
  SOLD


h106.jpg (36897 bytes)WAR OF 1812 - Captain Edman Thomas. Light Infantry. Lot of (4) War of 1812 items belonging to Captain Edman Thomas. (Mh.17); $675.
a) 14" x 16" imprinted 1811 Pennsylvania Commonwealth Officer's Commission to Thomas for rank of Captain of Light Infantry company attached to the First Battalion of the 53rd Regiment of the Militia. Wear and splitting at folds (archival document tape placed on verso), stains along left border, o/w very good.
b) October 8. 1812, 13" x 7 1/2" three page manuscript letter by Capt. Thomas, discuses desertion : "men from other companys are deserting daly, and are advertised and sent for with gards, and somgits clear but I have the beleaf of five captins and a number of thear men will stand to the last"; company officers and orders " and if the Mager falls and I stand, I take his pase. It was the desier of five captins and a number of thear men that I shold run fur Mager..."; rations and sutlers, etc. One quarter size hole (where the seal had been on the letter, not affecting much text, /w clean and legible. Will come with a typed transcript of letter.
c)9 1/2" x 7 3/4" manuscript receipt for blankets w/ company signatures. Irregulat along left edge, o/w VG.
d)13" x 7 1/2" manuscript company roster, listing app. 40 names. Some wear and foxing, o/w G-VG.
  


mh041.jpg (157438 bytes)WAR OF 1812  NYS BOUNTY. 1814 New York State printed and manuscript army enlistment and bounty. 8 1 /2" x 7" document certifying that Martin A. Clein of Dutchess County rec'd fifty dollars bounty and enlisted in  the United States army.  VG cond. (Mh.41); $140.    


h312.jpg (65126 bytes)WAR OF 1812 BOUNTY. Manuscript Army enlistment bounty receipt. 5" x 8", laid paper. "Received of Henry Starr Lieut. 37th Reg't Infty of the United States army, this first day of May 1813 Eight dollars, in part of my bounty for enlisting into the army of the United States for one year.Signed duplicate receipts, Lomantie(?) Whipple, Witness Clark Lanford. One horizontal fold, manuscript light but legible. o/w  G. (Mh.37):$75.    


mh015.jpg (165045 bytes)GENERAL HULL'S SURRENDER TO THE BRITISH .The Columbian Centenel. Boston, 20 " x 14 1/4". Sept 5, 1812 ,4pp. Several lengthy reports on the surrender, including an extract of a letter from General Hull. Also other wars news. Overall VG, some moderate foxing, from bound volume. (Mh.15); $65.
During the War of 1812, he had the distinct misfortune to be in command in Detroit when the British and their Indian allies overwhelmed his forces causing him to surrender Detroit to prevent heavy loss of life. For his actions, he was court-martialed as a traitor and sentenced to death. The charge of treason was withdrawn, but he never-the-less became the scapegoat for the loss of Detroit and was sentenced to die though the court recommended clemency which President Madison granted.
  


nw016.jpg (844402 bytes)NEWSPAPER- BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS. The Weekly Register, Baltimore, Saturday, Feb. 11, 1815. 9 ¾” x 6 ¼”. 16 pp complete , from disbanded volume. Most of the entire paper is devoted to Jackson’s victory at New Orleans. The time frame for the reports and letters is early through mid January. A key issue as there is numerous detailed accounts of the battle, and the corresponding aftermath. Some moderate foxing , back page split from issue. overall VG.(NW.16)

The Niles Weekly Register was a leading weekly news magazine with a national circulation, and was founded by Hezekiah Niles in 1811. As an indexed and relatively comprehensive summary of events during this 1811 – 1849 period, the Register is considered the paper of record for its age and has long been a favorite resource for historians. Its usual printing run was 16 book-sized pages, but it often included appendices and extra pages.

On January 8, 1815, American forces, under General Jackson, decisively defeat the British forces trying to capture New Orleans. The battle, which takes place after the Treaty of Ghent has been signed, is the most decisive American victory of the war.

The British chose New Orleans as their major objective. They ruled out a water assault on New Orleans and instead chose to mount a ground assault. They chose to bring their ships to Pea River in the mouth of the Mississippi. Guarding this entry to the Mississippi were five American gunboats. Their 29 guns and 145 men were no match for the 45 British barges manned by 1200 men with 43 guns. The British ships swiftly dispatched the American in a short battle on December 23 1814. The American ships however gave General Jackson the commander of American forces in New Orleans some additional time to prepare the defenses of the city, as well as make clear the direction of the advance of the British forces. The British forces then came ashore at the mouth of the Bayou Bienvenu unopposed. They hoped to head up the Bayou five miles to the Mississippi and then another 12 to New Orleans. An advance guard of 1500 men moved forward and captured the Viillere plantation. One of the American officers managed to escape and get to New Orleans to warn Jackson.

 

 


The USS Constitution, launched in 1797, was one of the six original frigates authorized for construction by the Naval Act of 1794. Designed to be one of the Navy's capital ships, the Constitution and the sister ships were larger and more heavily armed and built than the standard frigates of the period . She gained great fame during the War of 1812 against Great Britain, when captured numerous merchant ships and defeated five British warships. The battle with Guerriere earned her the nickname of "Old Ironsides". Retired from active service in 1881, she served as a receiving ship until designated a museum ship in 1907. She is the oldest commissioned naval vessel afloat in the world., and in 1997 she sailed again under her own power for her 200th birthday.

 

mh018.jpg (468396 bytes)CONSTITUTION DEFEATS JAVA. Philadelphia Gazette. June 18, 1813. 20 1/4" x 13"., 4 pp.  Page 2 has the British account of the capture of the Java from the report of Lieut. Chads, first Lieut of the his Majesty's ship. Corresponding article taken from the Boston Daily Advertiser has an American reaction of the British account by an officer on the Constitution. Both articles are two and half columns. Though very readable, paper exhibits moderate use and wear (most noticeably along center folds, the bottom of the paper has been cropped, affecting text (though uncertain to what extent, my estimation is three or four lines plus border). Taken from bound volume, has typical stitching marks, spine is partially detached along bottom edge. (Mh.18); $65. 
  Constitution vs. Java. On December 29th, 1812 the USS Constitution faced HMS Java in an intense battle off the coast of Brazil. Despite having her wheel shot away early in the battle Constitution was nevertheless victorious. After the battle US sailors boarded the enemy ship, and took Java's wheel as their own. After they had transferred all of the surviving British troops to their ship, along with the valuable cargo they found on board Java, they set her ablaze, and it was then Captain Bainbridge remarked, " a perfect wreck we made ". The defeat of Java, the second frigate lost to Constitution in six months, motivated a change in the tactics of the Royal Navy. No longer would their frigates be allowed to engage American frigates like Constitution alone. Only British ships-of-the-line or squadrons were permitted to come close enough to these ships to attack.  

 

 

 

 


 

  mh052.jpg (150481 bytes)NEW YORK LIGHT GUARD SHEET MUSIC. 1840 Militia sheet music " Hewitt's  Quick Step" 13" x 10". Complete, 5pp.  Good graphic stone lithograph, from bound volume, split at spine, some minor hint of foxing, overall VG. (Mh.52); $100.

 


 

mh049.jpg (255720 bytes)THOMAS S. JESUP. MLS: "Th: S. Jesup" as Quarter Master General, 1p, 8x10. Quarter Master General's Office, Washington CIty, June 15, 1825.  To Colonel Henry Stanton. Qm, Philadelphia. Signed. I am Sir, Respectfully, Yr. Ob't. svt.".  Thomas Sidney Jesup (1788-1860), appointed Quartermaster General with the rank of Brigadier General by President James Monroe, served in the position for 42 years, proving to be a capable administrator who initiated a number of reforms. Jesup, who had begun his military career in 1808 as a junior officer in the 7th Infantry, became Adjutant General to General William Hull in 1812. Taken prisoner during the surrender of Detroit, Jesup went on to fight in at Chippewa and Niagara after being exchanged. During the Seminole War, he was given command of U.S. troops, but Jesup returned to his Quartermaster General post after being wounded.  Original fold lines, along with a few diagonal fold lines in top right section,  overall fine cond. (Mh.49); $245. 


 

 

 

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