Maritime

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tr701.jpg (53455 bytes)SIDEWHEELER ADIRONDACK. Cdv 2 1/2" x 4". Broadside view of the steamship Adirondack. This ca. 1865 image was taken app. 10years prior to the vessel being removed from service in 1875 of the  Champlain Transportation Company. Manuscript notation on back " Near Whitehall Landing, Lake Champlain. LaBarre Whitehall NY photographer's stamp on back. A few dings on mount, exhibits some soiling, overall VG. Scarce view. ( Tr.701); $sod


tr708.jpg (40814 bytes)MISSISSIPPI RIVERBOAT INTERIOR. Stereo view, 3 1/2" x 7" orange mount, "Cabins of Mississippi Steamers." imprinted on bottom of mount. Photographed by W.H. Illingworth, published by Burritt & Pease. Light soiling on mount, o/w F cond. (Tr.708); $85.


tr705.jpg (96207 bytes)STEAMER ISLAND HOME. Boudoir photograph, 5 1/4" x 8 1/2". Broadside view of the Steamer Island Home. Baldwin Cookidge, photographer, Boston, Mass paste on label on verso.  Some minor dampstaining along the mount edges, o/w Fine condition. (Tr.705);$200.+  .
In 1855 the Nantucket and Cape Cod Steamboat Company purchased the steamer Island Home. From stem to stern she measured 184 feet and weighed 536 tons. For 41 years the Island Home ferried passengers, goods and mail between Nantucket and Cape Cod. She sank off Rhode Island in 1902 after 6 years as a work barge


mfb020.jpg (157742 bytes)AUSTIN TEXAS LAKE STEAMBOAT BEN HUR. ca. 1890s albumen image , 6” x 8 ¼” on 6 1/2" x 9" mount. Side of sidewheeler steamboat reads “Lake Navigation Co. Ben Hur“Photographer’s backmark of S.B. Hill Photographer Austin, Tex.(and in pencil - Steamer built by Captain Albian Shepard Austin, Texas. Fine condition. (tr790.20)$575. 

The steamboat Ben Hur was a three-story sidewheeler, provided cruises , along with dinner, dancing and vaudeville shows, in Lake McDonald , outside Austin, Tex. Lake McDonald was the result of the original Austin Dam, which was completed in 1893. It was the first dam built across the Colorado River and – according to the press hype of the day – the largest dam in the world.

By today's standards, the dam was unremarkable – a wall of granite and limestone, 65 feet high and 1,100 feet long, The city built a rail line, with electric trolley cars, to transport residents to the dam and its reservoir, Lake McDonald, named after the mayor. (It is now Lake Austin.). Lake McDonald became a popular attraction. Beside The excursion cruises, other attractions included a giant diving tower at the Ben Hur wharf and a grandstand and pavilion for musical performances. The Austin Dam was plagued by problems from the start. The structure was built on a fault line that allowed water to seep. Silt had filled nearly half the lake by February 1900. And the dam's design failed to accommodate the force that could be created by a large volume of water. All of this set up the dam for its fatal blow when a five-inch rain fell in the Austin area on April 6, 1900, along with heavy rains in the Hill Country. With no upstream dams to capture runoff, the Austin Dam was defenseless against the resulting flood wave, , and by April 7, the floodwaters crested at 11 feet atop the dam before it disintegrated, with two 250-foot sections – almost half the dam – breaking away. The flood also damaged a power house, drowning five workers, and destroyed the Ben Hur.

 


mfb021.jpg (291400 bytes)YAZOO RIVER STEAMBOAT KATIE ROBBINS.  Ca. 1880s albumen image , 7 1/4” x 9. Great view of the Katie Robbins steaming with a load o cotton. No photographer’s backmark of S.B. Hill Some minor soiling , overall fine condition. A very appealing image.  (tr791.21); $500.
The Katie Robbins went down from a collision on the Yazoo Rive with a barge in 1890. See "Steamboats and the Cotton Economy: River Trade in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta" By Harry P. Owens
for further reading. 

tr704.jpg (190500 bytes)SIDEWHEELER  CITY OF LAWRENCE. Ca. 1880's albumen image, 11" x 14 1/2" on a 14" x 17" mount. Beautiful broadside full of the deep draft steamboat. A bit of age toning on mount, small amount of lifting of image b/l corner, along with minor chipping on edge. Overall VG-fine cond. (Tr. 704); $650. 
Built in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1867, the sidewheel paddle steamer City of Lawrence was one of a fleet of steamers owned by companies that were or became subsidiaries of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. City of Lawrence was the first iron-hulled steamer on the Sound. She was part of the Norwich Line (Norwich & New York Transportation Company) that connected New York and New England cities such as Worcester and Boston via coordinated water-rail transport. The rail-steamer terminal is visible behind the City of Lawrence, and rail cars can be seen on the right. The City of Lawrence was wrecked at New London in 1907.        (lf)

tr713.jpg (411846 bytes)STERNWHEELER - W.C. BRADLEY. Ca. 1900 gelatin image, 6 1/4" x 8 1/4" on 10" x 12"  mount. Handsome  broadside full of this shallow draft steamboat. Some random spots of soiling, some wear to mount edges, overall Fine cond. (Tr. 7134); $400
W.C. Bradley Chattahoochee River in Georgia
. The sternwheeler was commissioned in 1898 and worked the Chattahoochee River .(From its source in the Blue Ridge Mountains the Chattahoochee River flows southwesterly to Atlanta , eventually turns due south to form the southern half of the Georgia/Alabama state line, it flows by Columbus, Georgia). She sank at Aspalaga (Florida) in 1919.  The Bradley measured 163 feet long by 26.1 feet wide, was built in Columbus, Ga. A Georgia newspaper of the day gave this description of the sternwheeler: “She is one of the neatest and trimmest craft afloat; and has a flat bottom and draws very little water. She is constructed with neat boiler decks, forward and aft, and has an immense carrying capacity for freight, as well as accommodation for quite a number of passengers.” The Bradley had cabins and a dining salon on the second tier, which was called the sun deck. The third deck, known as the Texas, served the same purpose as the dome on an observation railroad car. At the top was the pilot house, where the captain had an unobstructed view of the river. The craft was owned by the Merchants’ and Planters’ Steamboat Co., of which M.W. Kelly was president and W.C. Bradley served as general manager. The company owned another riverboat known as the Queen City. Along with travelers, riverboats carried a variety of freight including bales of cotton, barrels of tar and turpentine, fertilizer, flour and even bee hives.                                           

mfb096.jpg (260441 bytes)SHALLOW DRAFT STEAMBOAT- FLORIDA . Cabinet card, 6 1/2" x 4 1/4". Broadside view of a steamboat at dock.  Views of West Florida by Shear & Howe backmark. Exhibits some light soiling and wear, overall VG-F. (Mfb.96); $400.

 


 

tr803.jpg (584577 bytes)RIVERBOAT LICENSE TO PILOTS – 1875. United States Inspectors Certificate to Pilots. 8 ¼” x 10”. Certification to Silas Elkins for pilot of steam vessels  for the Big Sandy River and its tributaries.  Good graphic of a broadside of a sidewheeler. Original fold lines, exhibits some soiling and wear, overall VG+. (Tr.803); $165. 
The 1838 law proved inadequate as steamboat disasters increased in volume and severity. The 1847 to 1852 era was marked by an unusual series of disasters primarily caused by boiler explosions,  however many were also caused by fires and collisions. These disasters resulted in the passage of the Steamboat Act of May 30, 1852 in which enforcement powers were placed under the Department of the Treasury rather than the Department of Justice as with the Act of 1838. Under this law, the organization and form of a federal maritime inspection service began to emerge. Nine supervisory inspectors responsible for a specific geographic region were appointed. There were also provisions for the appointment of local inspectors by a commission consisting of the local District Collector of Customs, the Supervisory Inspector, and the District Judge. The important features of this law were the requirement for hydrostatic testing of boilers, and the requirement for a boiler steam safety valve. This law further required that both pilots and engineers be licensed by the local inspectors. Even though time and further insight proved the Steamboat Act inadequate, it must be given credit for starting legislation in the right perspective. Probably the most serious shortcoming was the exemption of freightboats, ferries, tugboats and towboats, which continued to operate under the superficial inspection requirements of the law of 1838. Again, disasters and high loss of life prompted congressional action through the passage of the Act of February 28, 1871.

tr805.jpg (618184 bytes)RIVERBOAT LICENSE TO MASTERS – 1890. United States Inspectors Certificate to Masters. 8 ¼” x 10. Certification to Silas Elkins for masters of steam vessels  for rivers flowing into the Gulf of Mexico, and as pilot of named rivers. Original fold lines, exhibits some soiling and wear, overall VG+. (Tr.805):$125.
The 1838 law proved inadequate as steamboat disasters increased in volume and severity. The 1847 to 1852 era was marked by an unusual series of disasters primarily caused by boiler explosions,  however many were also caused by fires and collisions. These disasters resulted in the passage of the Steamboat Act of 

 organization and form of a federal maritime inspection service began to emerge. Nine supervisory inspectors responsible for a specific geographic region were appointed. There were also provisions for the appointment of local inspectors by a commission consisting of the local District Collector of Customs, the Supervisory Inspector, and the District Judge. The important features of this law were the requirement for hydrostatic testing of boilers, and the requirement for a boiler steam safety valve. This law further required that both pilots and engineers be licensed by the local inspectors. Even though time and further insight proved the Steamboat Act inadequate, it must be given credit for starting legislation in the right perspective. Probably the most serious shortcoming was the exemption of freightboats, ferries, tugboats and towboats, which continued to operate under the superficial inspection requirements of the law of 1838. Again, disasters and high loss of life prompted congressional action through the passage of the Act of February 28, 1871.


tr792.jpg (181775 bytes)STEAMBOAT  - UNISSUED CERTIFICATE FOR SHARE 1834. Certificate for shares in the Steamboat "Helen" unissued, 3 x 7 1/2. , 1834. The "HELEN" a double-hull wooden steamboat was being rebuilt Henry Burden for use on the Hudson River. Henry Burden (1791-1871) was an engineer and businessman who built an industrial complex in Troy, NY called the Burden Iron Works that featured the most powerful water wheel in the world. In 1833 Burden built the steamboat "Helen," named in honor of his wife. Its deck rested upon two cigar-shaped hulls, 300 feet in length, with a paddle-wheel amidships thirty feet in diameter. The "Helen" made an experimental voyage in December, 1833. In one trial in July 1834 she recorded 18 miles per hour. Another vessel, launched in 1837, had many improvements upon the first boat, all patented by Burden. (tr792); $35. 

 

 


 

tr770.jpg (69943 bytes)1854. THE KEDGE-ANCHOR; OR SAILORS' ASSISTANT. William Brady, Sailing Master, U.S.N. 8vo (9 ½” x 6”). 1854, Seventh edition. Original dark/blackbrown cloth with gilt lettering and design of an anchor in gilt on spine. Seventy engravings. Wear to extremities (bump corners, wear to heel and crown of spine); internally has some foxing and dampstaing to rt side of back pages.  Reference book “appertaining to the Practical Evolutions of Modern Seamanship, Rigging, Knotting, Blocks, …” Sabin 7316, Albion pg. 72. (Tr.770); $225.

 

Bill of Ladings. Bill of lading are documents between the shipper of a particular good and the carrier detailing the type, quantity and destination of the good being carried. The bill of lading also serves as a receipt of shipment when the good is delivered to the predetermined destination. 


tr767.jpg (56336 bytes)1869 MISS. RIVER STEAMBOAT BILL OF LADING. 1869 Illustrated Bill of Lading, with nice depiction of a Miss. River Steamboat,  out of the Port of Evansville. 7 1/2 x 9 1/2. VG condition,(Tr.767);$45.


tr786.jpg (249214 bytes)1851 OHIO  RIVER STEAMBOAT BILL OF LADING. 1851 Illustrated Bill of Lading, with nice depiction of a sidewheeler river steamboat,  out of the Port of Madison , Ind.  10" x 8". Fine condition,(Tr.786);$45.


tr787.jpg (344371 bytes)1851 OHIO  RIVER STEAMBOAT BILL OF LADING. 1851 Illustrated Bill of Lading, with nice depiction of a sidewheeler river steamboat,  out of the Port of Madison , Ind.  10" x 8". Fine condition,(Tr.787);$45.


tr788.jpg (347910 bytes)1865 LAKE MICHIGAN SHIP BILL OF LADING. 1865 Illustrated Bill of Lading, with nice depiction of a street scene with large masted ship in view. Port of Muskegon, Mich.. 7 3/4 x 10. Orig. fold lines, overall Fine condition,(Tr.788);$50.


tr785.jpg (271301 bytes)1871 LAKE MICHIGAN SHIP BILL OF LADING. 1871 Illustrated Bill of Lading, with engraving of sailing ship. Port of Escanaba, Mich.. 10 3/4 x 8 1/4. Orig. fold lines, overall Fine condition,(Tr.785);$50.

Canals

tr769.jpg (116761 bytes)1832 OHIO AND ERIE CANAL RECEIPTS. Lot of two, 3 1/4" x 5 1/4" voucher  of Engineer Price of completed work for section 103; and 2 7/8" x 6 1/4" check from th Western Reserve Bank for contract work on the canal. Both pieces exhibit light wear, overall VG. (Tr.769); $125.  
 In 1825 ground was broken on the canal, sections opening as work was completes,  and in 1832 the entire canal system was completed, connecting the Ohio River at Portsmouth and Lake Erie at Cleveland, Ohio.  The canal carried freight traffic from 1827 to 1861, and then freight traffic rapidly diminished due to the construction of railroads. From 1862 to 1913, the canal served as a water source to industries and towns. In 1913 the canal was abandoned after much of it was destroyed by a flood.


tr755.jpg (81071 bytes)ERIE CANAL. 6 3/4" x 8", 1858 part imprinted Bill of Lading, on board Canal Boat to be delivered at Palmyra NY. Blue paper, light toning at fold line, o/w F cond. (Tr. 755). $55. 


tr789.jpg (175136 bytes)ERIE CANAL. 4 1/4" x 8 1/4 ", 1836 part imprinted receipt  to Albany & New York Line of Tow-Boats for freight . Laid paper, original horizontal fold, small diagonal fold line top right corner, overall VG- fine. (Tr. 789). $75. 


tr793.jpg (263074 bytes)CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRY. ILLINOIS & MICHIGAN CANAL 186_.  Imprinted document, 4” x 8” . Unissued . According to canal regulations all persons who operated boats on the waterway were required to register them with canal officials. Information contained on each vessel certificate includes name of the boat, name and address of the boat owner, and the date of registration. The Illinois and Michigan Canal connected the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico. It ran 96 miles from the Chicago River in Bridgeport, Chicago to the Illinois River at LaSalle-Peru. The canal crossed the Chicago Portage and helped establish Chicago as the transportation hub of the United States, before the railroad era. It was opened in 1848, its function was largely replaced by the wider and shorter Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in 1900 and it ceased transportation operations with the completion of the Illinois Waterway in 1933. Unissued, fine condition.(Tr.798); $75.

 

 

 


  

tr758.jpg (141895 bytes)SHIP'S CHANDLER ILLUSTRATED BILLHEAD. 1868 7"x8 1/2",.  1868, Hoplins  & Nelson, New York illustrated billhead. Good graphic of a vessel under sail. riginal fold lines, , some light edge wear , overall Vg-F. (Tr758); $49.99. 


tr772.jpg (157539 bytes)1878 THE YACHTER' S MARCH. 14"x11" 1878, 5pp complete. Handsome full page illustrated cover. Split spine, some light edge wear and chipping, overall Vg-F. (Tr.772); $50. 


sm971.jpg (658647 bytes)SHEET MUSIC – THE BIRD AT SEA, 1836. 5pp. Sheet music has some very light wear and some minor soiling, from bound volume with accompanying bindery marks along spine, overall the condition is fine.(sm971); $55. 

 

tr706.jpg (205331 bytes)LIGHTHOUSE - STEREO VIEW CA. 1870s. Stereo view 3 1/2" x 7"; Boston Harbor Narrows ["Bug"] Lighthouse G. W. Tirrell, east Weyworth, Mass photographer's backmark.Close view of Boston Harbor Narrows ["Bug"] Lighthouse at low tide. At the railing can be seen workmen posing for the camera. Built in 1856, Bug Light stood until 1929 to warn mariners of the Harding’s Ledge, four miles to the southeast. Some light foxing and soiling, overall VG+.  (Sv.  ); $85.


 

tr759.jpg (135243 bytes)SHEET MUSIC.1908 - PANAMA CANAL MARCH - PHOTO ILL COVER. 1908 "Panama Canal March" The Prsioner's Hope" 11 1/2 x 10 3/4, 5pp complete. Photo illustrated cover of the opening of the canal. (Tr759).$45.00


 

 

ck101.jpg (137538 bytes)WHALING - 1861 ANDREW HICKS SIGNED CHECK.   1861. 2 3/8 x 7. Merchants Bank, New Bedford, Mass. Engraving of vessel under full sail.  Crossed Cancelled, two pinholes rt side, overall VG-fine cond. (Ck.101); $24. 

 

ck104.jpg (287836 bytes)WHALING - 1865 ANDREW HICKS SIGNED CHECK.   1861. 2 5/8 x 7 3/4. Merchants Bank, New Bedford, Mass. Engraving of vessel under full sail, two cent revenue stamp affixed t/rt corner.   Crossed cancelled, original fold lines, tightly trimmed left side, overall VG-fine cond. (Ck.104); $24. 

Andrew Hicks was born in Westport, MA 1799,  fitted out a vessel in 1836 and thus began an extended whaling business, which he continued with marked success for more than half a century. At one time he owned interests in 11 vessels (Including the Andrew Hicks and Mermaid) and during his career built 8 or more vessels. He was for 41 years before his death a director of the Merchants' National Bank of New Bedford. The ship Andrew Hicks is known to be the last American Whale ship in operation, 1880-1891. The Andrew Hicks was then sold to become a merchant ship in 1917.

 

 

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